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  1. #1
    jackpotcasinoguide's Avatar
    jackpotcasinoguide is offline Private Member
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    Default BAD NEWS EVERYONE, THE BILL HAS PASSED THE SENATE!

    SENATE BANKING COMMITTEE APPROVAL OF S.627,
    THE UNLAWFUL INTERNET GAMBLING FUNDING ACT

    VANCOUVER, British Columbia, July 31, 2003 -- “The Interactive Gaming Council regrets that the U.S. Congress took another step backwards today when the Senate Banking Committee approved S.627. Our country has had one sorry experience with Prohibition, and this approach will not work any better in cyber space.

    “The Senate Banking Committee’s amendment to eliminate state governments’ right to regulate online gaming sets a bad precedent. State governments, which have historically licensed, regulated, and taxed the gaming industry, may eventually forfeit this right as well as vital gaming tax revenues to the Federal government. State governments and the gaming industry should be concerned about a potential for a Federal siphoning of gaming taxes that are often dedicated to important state programs that benefit senior citizens and children.

    “The IGC had hoped that Banking Committee members would recognize that legalization and strict regulation, rather than prohibition, is the only way to achieve important policy goals. More than ever, we believe that perceived problems associated with interactive gaming --- the potential for exacerbating the problems of compulsive gamblers, for underage betting and for money laundering --- can only be resolved through a combination of up-to-date technology, proper internal controls and stringent regulatory oversight.

    “We take seriously the concerns expressed by members of Congress. IGC members will continue to accomplish as much as industry self-regulation can to deal with these social issues. But ultimately this is a task that requires the force of governmental regulation. It’s a shame that Congress seems intent on making futile gestures at prohibition of interactive gaming, when regulation of traditional, land-based gaming has served our society so well.

    “IGC members are disappointed that very little consideration has been given to developing a practical and politically palatable regulatory scheme for legal and regulated Internet gambling in the U.S. The debate needs to include discussion on how regulation can reverse the current situation where monies from U.S. citizens leave the United States with no subsequent benefit, directly or indirectly, to our government or to our citizens. One consequence of this is that no funds are dedicated to protecting children and problem gamblers through education and other programs.

    “The IGC also believes that American citizens will not appreciate their financial institutions dictating how they can spend their money. That intrusive prospect has to worry anyone involved in e-commerce generally, let alone those concerned about a deprivation of their personal freedom.

    “You don’t have to be a gambler to be wary of the ‘Big Brother’ implications of S.627 and H.R.2143. Americans treasure freedom of personal choice and the right to privacy, and do not want the government to force banks to monitor every transaction that is done online.”


    About the IGC

    Formed in 1996, the IGC is the leading trade association for the international interactive gambling industry with its membership operating or supplying services to most of the reputable interactive sites on the World Wide Web. Based in Vancouver, Canada, the IGC champions fair and honest interactive gambling environments. To help parents protect their children, IGC members are encouraged to participate in the self-labeling system of the Internet Content Rating Association. The IGC has developed a Code of Conduct for members, and a program called Helping Hand to assist problem gamblers.

  2. #2
    VPJunkie is offline Private Member
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    Default

    Don't panic yet.

  3. #3
    VPJunkie is offline Private Member
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    daweller is offline Private Member
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    Seriously,

    This means nothing to me,
    People can just use Paypal to deposit.

    How do they regulate people?
    Regulate the CC companies?

    People can just use Paypal.

    I don't get it

  5. #5
    Ace Fun's Avatar
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    PayPal goes where visa goes.

    This, coupled with the Visa restrictions in the adult industry and the american banks attitudes towards "foreign" and therefore inferior citizens, could very well lose America its dominance in Internet payments

  6. #6
    VPJunkie is offline Private Member
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    This is the problem - people don't understand.

    They're going to force the ISP's of all these internet users to monitor their activity. That means if AOL sees you gambling at an internet casino, they can report you to the US Gov't.

    They're going to ask the Banks to monitor all our expenditures. That means your bank can report you to the USGovt if they think any of your spending is suspicious.

    Um....and PayPal stopped taking any gambling transactions nearly a year ago, and got fined the other day by a US Court.

    Make no mistake about it - this is BIG BROTHER coming of age.

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    daweller is offline Private Member
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    I don't know though,

    If ISPs like AOL were to monitor everyone's financial transactions, that would be expensive to do so.

    Same with banks diverting resources to monitor financial transactions.

    If gov't supplies the money to institutions to monitor this stuff, then I can see it happening.
    But if the gov't just expects ISPs and Banks to use resources, or hire resources, to monitor transactions... then I can see the ISPs and Banks being resentful of this, and not bothering with it.

  8. #8
    jeffyfan is offline Public Member
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    Funny how early this week the Gov. wanted to start its own gambling site takeing bets on the next attack and where it would be and how long it would take to catch their most wanted. That didn't go over now they want to end gambling for everyone. I know they have been looking at the bill for a long time but had that site went up I bet we wouldn't hear any more about the bill. I think they could find more things to worry about than gambling. Like protecting kids and drugs.
    Just my 2 cents worth. Thought I'd put it in since my 18 year old just risked his life over seas to fight for our FREEDOM.
    Jonda

  9. #9
    house-money is offline New Member
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    Hey guys, new to the board;


    Instead of dwelling on what we cant do, we should put our heads together and figure out how to circumvent the current payment structure. As I recall, 10 years ago I couldnt gamble unless I went to Atlantic city, and people seemed to figure out a way around that...being able to pay might be hindered temporarily, but as in most cases, people will figure out a way to do something if they truly want to do it.

  10. #10
    VPJunkie is offline Private Member
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    Actually, we need to fight the bigger issue here, which is the invasion of our privacy and monitoring of our internet activity. :eeek:

    We CAN stop this, and GPWA is preparing for battle as you read this.

  11. #11
    Ace Fun's Avatar
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    Some time ago there were reports that Microsoft had left back doors in Windows for various government departments to use. This was rumoured to be part of its anti-trust agreements. Various hackers have discovered these and they have been closed. Eyedog is one backdoor that springs to mind.

    A lot of people wondered why Microsoft opened all the ports in XP and left them unprotected - maybe this was government influenced as well. Certainly it will allow government departments to monitor individuals internet activity without requiring the likes of AOL to report to them. There are also a number of relay stations that the government could tap, monitoring IP addresses would be fairly easy.

    The answer is to look at free hardware firewall solutions like Smoothwall, and to move away from Microsoft based software for using the Internet.

  12. #12
    jeffyfan is offline Public Member
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    I have joined a program where I can send out bulk e mails so if you come up with somethink I can pass on besides the banner let me know and I'll gladly put it on my e mail
    Jonda

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