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  1. #1
    The Buzz's Avatar
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    Default China cracking down on online gambling

    There are all sorts of reports today on China cracking down on Internet gambling. Apparently, it runs counter to "building a harmonious society."

    http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2...ent_813737.htm

  2. #2
    CityGuard's Avatar
    CityGuard is offline Former GPWA Program Manager
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Buzz
    Apparently, it runs counter to "building a harmonious society."
    Yes, gambling is terrible...except if it is land-based and only in the Macau province. In that case, it's a great boon to the economy and something to encourage.

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    pgaming's Avatar
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    Default So is Turkey

    So is Turkey as reported by Zone-H



    A bill has been recently approved in Turkey as a countermeasure against indecent broadcasting and online gambling. This measure will give the national Information technology Security Agency the authority to block any broadcast that is believed to threaten state security, as stated in Article 301 of the Turkish Penal Code.

    As reported on January 4th by the Turkish web newspaper Yeni Safak, the approval of the bill has re-opened the debate about freedom of expression on the Internet in Turkey because according to the new draft , the IT Security Agency will work as a sort of “huge eyes” with the task of suing any violation of the controversial Article 301.

    The Article 301 took effect in June 1st, 2005 as part of a package of penal-law reform that were introduced to bring Turkey up to EU standards. It basically makes it a crime to insult "Turkishness", as it states that:
    1. A person who publicly denigrates Turkishness, the Republic or the Grand National Assembly of Turkey, shall be punishable by imprisonment of between six months and three years.
    2. A person who publicly denigrates the Government of the Republic of Turkey, the judicial institutions of the State, the military or security organizations shall be punishable by imprisonment of between six months and two years.
    3. In cases where denigration of Turkishness is committed by a Turkish citizen in another country the punishment shall be increased by one third.
    4.Expressions of thought intended to criticize shall not constitute a crime.
    Penalties for the transgressors have been summarized into 5 main points (Source: BBC Monitoring European):
    1. Insulting the president according to Article 299 of the Turkish Penal Code: between one and four years' imprisonment. If committed via the press then add one third.
    2. Broadcasts made over the internet in contravention of Article 301 "Denigrating Turkishness, the republic, the institutions and organs of the state," which so many famous people have been tried under: between six months and three years in prison.
    3. Crimes in Chapter 4 of the Turkish Penal Code headed "Crimes Against State Security" if committed via the internet can be punished by up to life imprisonment.
    4. Crimes committed against the constitutional regime if committed via the internet will be punished according to Articles 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315 and 316 of the Turkish Penal Code and can include life imprisonment.
    5. Publishing via the internet terrorist organization announcements and statements according to Article 6 of the Counter- Terrorism Law will incur between one and three years in prison.
    Amnesty International considers that the attempt to draw a distinction between criticism and denigration is highly problematic...especially on the Internet, where people is used to express their opinion quite “freely” in forums, blogs and other digital spaces.
    Turkish web surfers are now seriously threatened by constant intrusions in their private “digital life” and they could be persecuted for any action that in some way could be considered as against “Turkishness”.
    We definitely hope that this will not happen, but considering that since this Article became law, charges have been brought in more than 60 cases, we feel quite pessimistic about it.
    Among the cases opened under article 301 there are a number of journalists and publishers, and students such as Fatih Tas i a 26-year-old student of Communications and Journalism at Istanbul University and the owner of a publishing house.
    Orhan Pamuk (prize winner novelist), is one of these cases.
    greek39

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    Pablo is offline Private Member
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    Seems like a trend may be developing out there. We should count with seeing more "politicians" doing the same in the future.

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    China is just chock full of anti-Internet news. They've banned new Internet cafes (Reuters) and established rehab centers (Washington Post) for people addicted to the Net -- which apparently is a big concern facing the government.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Buzz View Post
    China is just chock full of anti-Internet news. They've banned new Internet cafes (Reuters) and established rehab centers (Washington Post) for people addicted to the Net -- which apparently is a big concern facing the government.
    Yes I heard about this on CNN yesterday.

    greek39

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    pgaming's Avatar
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    More from China?

    Written by Alberto Redi (halfmoon)
    Tuesday, 06 March 2007

    Beijing government has just banned the opening of new Internet Cafès in 2007, Reuters news service reported today. Chinese authorities declared that a similar decision was due to their concern about the increase of cases of Internet-addiction and Juvenile crimes linked to web activities.
    Actually, China has registered an alarming rise in the number of teenagers and young adult Internet addicts: for example, a case of deathly internet-devotion dates back to last week when a 26-years-old man died after a "marathon" online gaming session .

    And just last month 8 young Internet-geeks were arrested for producing and disseminating a severe computer virus .
    The worry about the influence of Internet Cafès on teens, however, isn’t connected just with Cyber Crime, since according to Chinese deputy Yu Wen "It is common to see students from primary and middle schools lingering in Internet bars overnight, puffing on cigarettes and engrossed in online games."
    Beijing already adopted some countermeasures such as restricting minors from cyber cafes and limiting online game playing times, but these initiatives should not have worked properly…
    "In 2007, local governments must not sanction the opening of new Internet bars," Xinhua news agency quoted a directive jointly released by 14 government departments, including the Ministry of Culture, as saying.
    The notice said Internet cafés that had received planning approval would need to be completed by 30 June 2007.
    BEIJING (Reuters) - An obese 26-year-old man in northeastern China died after a "marathon" online gaming session over the Lunar New Year holiday, state media said on Wednesday.
    The 150-kg (330-lb) man from Jinzhou, in Liaoning province, collapsed on Saturday, the last day of the holiday, after spending "almost all" of the seven-day break playing online games, the China Daily said, citing his parents.
    Xu Yan, a local teacher, said the "dull life" during the holiday prompted many people to turn to computer games for entertainment.
    "There are only two options. TV or computer. What else can I do in the holiday as all markets, KTV and cafeterias are shut down?" the paper quoted Xu as saying.
    Source: Sophos

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Experts at SophosLabs?, Sophos's global network of virus, spyware and spam analysis centers, have welcomed the news that Chinese authorities have arrested a group of hackers in connection with the Fujacks worm. The worm, also known as Whboy) made headlines last month because it converts icons of infected programs into a picture of a panda burning joss-sticks as it stole usernames and passwords from online games players. According to Chinese media reports, eight suspects have been held in Wuhan, the capital city of Hubei Province in central China. One of those arrested, 25-year-old Li Jun, is believed to use the handle "Whboy" and to be the creator of the Fujacks malware. According to a police statement, Li Jun earned more than US $12,500 by selling the malware to other internet hackers.
    greek39

  8. #8
    WinYourWayKyle is offline Private Member
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    Hopefully we dont lose the Chinese market.... I would say they would be second to the US for the number of people that gamble online.... If we lose them, the online gaming industry is in for a big crash..... Hopefully this does not happen....

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