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  1. #1
    chaumi is online now Private Member
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    Default solving http2 issue

    GPS keeps giving me a recommendation to use HTTP/2

    But I thought that would only be the case if I wasn't on https, which I am.

    Any ideas what might be happening?


    PS might know what's causing it, if anyone else is getting the same. Just got this from WPX hosting support (so it might be a WPX issue only).....



    We are aware of the issue and have contacted the Lighthouse developers regarding it.

    You can track it on their GitHub Issue page: Thank you for reaching out.

    Overall the resolution should not take more than a day or two(depending on the Google Developers).
    Last edited by chaumi; 9 March 2021 at 1:51 am. Reason: addition

  2. #2
    casino2k.com's Avatar
    casino2k.com is offline Private Member
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    Default

    I'm not sure to understand the question.
    If you talk about enabling HTTP/2 for the site in your signature: HTTP2 is already enabled.
    Matteo Casino2K

  3. #3
    chaumi is online now Private Member
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    Default

    No. the Google page speed tool is throwing up an HTTP/2 error that it shouldn't...and hence affecting the speed score negatively

    I've since found out it's a known problem that may/will be affecting many site scores....

    This thread seems to refer to it....https://github.com/GoogleChrome/lighthouse/issues/7326

  4. #4
    Michael Martinez is offline Public Member
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    HTTP/2 is derived from Google's SPDY protocol. It differs from HTTP/1.1 in that the browser and server agree to bundle fetch requests in a single TCP connection.

    In other words, HTTP/1.0 and HTTP/1.1 require that the browser open new TCP connections for each resource requested:


    • Page URL
    • Stylesheet 1
    • Stylesheet 2 ...
    • Stylesheet ... n
    • Font 1 ...
    • Font ... n
    • Analytics code 1 ...
    • Analytics code ... n
    • etc.



    Every request goes "Open Connection", "Make request", "receive response", "close connection". It's very time-consuming.

    With HTTP/2, the browser and server use a single stream, so the connection stays open and they maintain communication all through the process of downloading the page and its resources.

    There is a known risk of what's called a "race condition" (and a few have been documented in the wild but they are still unlikely). When a race condition occurs, the server accidentally mingles data from two streams (totally separate connections) together. I don't know of any cases where race conditions have been exploited by hackers.

    HTTP/3 is more secure than HTTP/2 but hasn't yet been widely adopted. * See below.

    HTTP/2 is still only used by a minority of Websites and it's only in the last few months that Google's tools have begun ATTEMPTING to work with HTTP/2 connections.

    It hurts nothing to activate HTTP/2 on your server as long as you keep HTTP/1.1 active so that clients can fall back to that protocol.


    * ADDED ON EDIT. According to Wikipedia, HTTP/3 is still an "upcoming protocol".

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  6. #5
    universal4's Avatar
    universal4 is online now Forum Administrator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Martinez View Post
    * ADDED ON EDIT. According to Wikipedia, HTTP/3 is still an "upcoming protocol".
    So, this means that Google still has time to screw it up.

    Just Kidding....sorta

    Great explanation Michael

    Rick
    Universal4

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